May 30, 2017

Back to Springdale

As "the only school for boys", today is the first day in school at PAREF Springdale. Teachers, staffs, and students are excited. Everyone is excited especially the new ones. You see new faces, new smiles, hear new laughter, and new kids playing at the quadrangle. For more than 16 years already as a boys school here in Cebu…

…in Springdale, you see "Gentlemen".

Bene Omnia Facere!

Springdale wins against CIE, 48-42

PAREF Springdale Titans defeated the Cebu International Education (CIE), 48-42, in the secondary division of the 1st Private Schools Developmental League at the Cebu Doctors’ University yesterday.

 

The Springdale Titans started slow and trailed the CIE Lions, 18-8, owing to the strong showing of Akeem Amistad. However, the Titans was able to recover in the second quarter with Zach Go, Ace Gochuan, Carlo Diola and Tonyo Carcel combining for 14 points to cut the lead to 24-22.

 

After a give-and-go battle in the third quarter, the Titans banked on Go, Gochuan, Carcel and Dional for their fourth quarter run as they delivered 16 points for their close six-point win.

In the other games, Cebu Cherish School defeated St. Louis School of Mandaue, 54-35, while Mt. Olives Christian Academy routed St. Francis of Assisi School, 63-33.

In the elementary division, Springdale made it 2-0 for the Titans with a 28-23 win over the San Isidro Parish School.

Tournament director Marlove Alquizar said they organized this tournament to give a chance to private schools with small populations to compete in basketball.

The secondary divisions, which attracted eight teams, will have a single round robin, while the three-team elementary division will have a double-round robin play.

The tournament, which will have games every Thursday, Friday and Saturday, will run until March 3.

Published in the Sun.Star Cebu newspaper on February 05, 2012. By Iste S. Leopoldo Saturday, February 4, 2012

Cebuano cyclist Igi Maximo is youngest member of Philippine Team

Courtesy photo by Maximax

Sixteen-year-old Cebuano junior cyclist Luis Miguel “Igi” Maximo achieved a long-standing dream of his as he was named to the Philippine cycling team, becoming its youngest member and the only junior cyclist from the Visayas and Mindanao.

PhilCycling, the UCI-recognized National Sports Association of cycling in the country headed by Mayor Abraham Tolentino, conducted two nationwide qualifying rounds for the National Junior Trials.

In the Tour of Clark last Nov. 26-27 in Clark, Pampanga, which served as the preliminary round for Juniors 16-17, Maximo finished in second place in the Individual Time Trial (ITT) 10km and third overall in the General Classification standings.

In the Tagaytay Trials last Dec. 12, in spite of travel fatigue and pressure from school commitments, he delivered a sixth place finish in the Individual Time Trial (ITT) 30km among the 22 aspiring cyclists.

“I did not expect it will come this soon. I was up against older riders during the Trials, all I wished for was a slot in the national training pool,” said Maximo. “Cyclists from Pangasinan and Central Luzon—known hotbeds of cycling in the country—were strong. The top-of-the-line cycling racing equipment provided by Cebu-based YKK Trading really made the big difference in the race,” added Maximo.

As part of the Philippine National Junior Team, Maximo is now in the shortlist for inclusion into the country’s participation in the 2012 Asian Juniors Cycling Championships this coming Feb. 8 to 18 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Published in the Cebu Daily News on January 3, 2012 by Jonas Panerio, CDN.

A Unique Outreach

With outreach programs traditionally practiced during the Christmas season, seventy select students of Bonbon Elementary School in Cebu City became beneficiaries of a one-of-a-kind outreach program. 

The outreach on January 2, 2012 was organized by Dream Foundation led by PAREF Springdale Alumnus & Philippine Azkal Player, Paolo Pascual, and Miss Earth Philippines-Water 2011, Murielle Adrienne Orais. Some alumni of PAREF Springdale Batch 2008 and 2007, and friends joined them. 

It doesn't come as a surprise why Bonbon was chosen as the venue. It's because Paolo's high school batch of 2008 pioneered the outreach in Bonbon Elementary School during their senior year. Since then, Bonbon Elementary School officially became an adopted-school of PAREF Springdale School with already three work missions organized by subsequent batches.

At exactly 10:40 AM, the activity started with a short introduction of the team members. Fun games were played that broke the ice and created a bonding between the kids and the Dream Foundation Team; filling the school with loud cheers and laughter. The pupils were then treated to lunch and gifts. 

Notwithstanding the celebrity status of Muriel and Paolo, the short program was without any press.

They’ve both implied that the children’s smiles and their simple “thank you’s” are in themselves PRICELESS! Their example reminds one of a proverbial phrase, “But when you are giving in charity, let not your left hand perceive what your right hand is doing.”

Text by Choy Tura

Springdale wins in Knowledge Challenge

The Bethany Christian School and PAREF Springdale swept wins during the elementary eliminations of the 2nd BTC Knowledge Challenge on Sept. 10.

The teams from grade 3 to grade 6 dominated the first round of the inter-school quiz bee at the Banilad Town Centre (BTC) and will compete in the finals on Sept. 24.

St. Theresa’s College and Acedemia del Christifidelis also had three teams going into the finals as well as Cebu Bradford School with two teams.

A team each from Cebu Eastern College, Childlink Learning Center, Marie Ernestine School and St. Paul Learning Center also made it to the finals.

Each team has three students. The eliminations for the secondary division will be held today, Sept. 17 at the second floor lobby of the BTC main building.

While 11 schools competed in the elementary division, 10 schools have registered teams to compete from first to fourth year levels.

Other than the schools mentioned, the Don Bosco Technology Center and Harvest Christian School also competed in the high school division.

Jiggy Junior of Y101-FM is quiz master. Now in its second year, the Knowledge Challenge is in collaboration with the Department of Education that reviewed the quiz items and provided the judges.

The winners will receive golden BTC medals and gifts from BTC tenants, while the school with the most number of winning teams will get a trophy as overall champion.

Published in the Inquirer News on September 17, 2011.

Paolo Pascual: Being a part of the Azkals is a very, very big achievement

MANILA, Philippines — Yannick Tuason and Paolo Pascual leave everything behind for the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to play with the Azkals.

Paolo Pascual, goalkeeper: The other ‘Papa P’

He may not be Piolo, but Paolo Pascual now has his fair share of crazy, adoring fans since joining the Azkals as one of its newest homegrown recruits.

Paolo and the rest of the U-23 (Under 23) players are currently preparing for the Southeast Asian Games in November in Indonesia where he will be the first goalkeeper.

He is also getting back to fighting form after he dislocated his shoulder almost two months ago.
 
Photo grabbed with permission from Paolo's Facebook.

Paolo was just a regular Business and Entrepreneurship college junior at the University of San Carlos in Cebu when he got a call from the Philippine Football Federation asking him to try out for the Azkals.

While it’s already an achievement to try out with other experienced and talented players who come from the other parts of the globe, what sets Paolo apart is the fact that he made it to the national team at only 20 years old. The 5’11” Cebuano native has been training with the Azkals since January.

Paolo started playing football when he was seven years old at Paref Springdale School. He was a striker until Grade VII when his coach Mario Ceniza realized Paolo had the potential to be a good goalkeeper given his height. He has since played in Global Smartmatic FC and in the Philippine U-19 team that competed in China.

Paolo is supposed to be in fourth year college now, but because most of the trainings are conducted in Manila, he is now looking for a school in the capital city where he can continue his studies while he attends the national team trainings at the same time.

Even if he is away from home, Paolo relates that he is always reminded by his father to “always be an intelligent athlete” by balancing academics and sports.

How did you get into football? I started when I was seven years old, for school. Since then, I’ve been playing football in elementary, high school and college. It has always been my childhood dream to play football.

Who are your football idols? Being a goalkeeper, I look up to Iker Casillas. Locally, I look up to my partner, Eduard Sacapano. He has a good work ethic and he has been with the team for so long so I think he deserves to get noticed, he deserves credit.

How would you describe yourself as a player? A goalkeeper should have discipline and a good work ethic. You shouldn’t give up. Even up to the last minute, you should give it your all. Neil Etheridge gives us a lot of tips. When he’s here, he trains us. He’s got a lot of really, really good and useful tips.

What type of a student are you? I’m silent, kinda studious and friendly.

Was it a tough decision choosing between school and being part of the national football team? It is football for now. But I know you can’t get a living by just doing football. You have to earn after football also. So you need a college degree and all that to go through with life. I talked to my mom and dad about it first and I told them that this is just a once-in-alifetime experience. My parents have been very supportive. They’re the ones who have been encouraging me to join the Azkals.

Who inspires you during a game? Number one is God. Next is ‘yung mga na-achieve nung veteran teammates namin, all the Pinoys who have been with the Azkals ever since, like Roel Gener. Their dedication to the team and to the country is amazing.

Do you have any rituals before a game? I just pray.

How has football changed your life? Now that we’re part of the team, you should be more conscious about your health. That’s something to focus on.

What do you consider is your biggest achievement so far? I think being a part of the Azkals is a very, very big achievement already.

What was your craziest experience with a fan? In Barotac (Iloilo) it is pretty wild. The crowd there is rowdy compared to Manila. Here kasi, they keep things to themselves. There they would, they release. They do anything.

Are you single or in a relationship? I’m single.

What do you look for in a girlfriend? I like someone who is God-fearing and family-oriented.

The biggest sacrifice that you have to make as an Azkal? Being away from the family. I’m from Cebu and to move here to Manila is a big sacrifice for me.

What was the biggest adjustment for you coming from Cebu? The life and the family. Homesickness. In Cebu, I have everything there, you have a home, you’re family is there for you. But here, you have to be independent. You have to learn how to live on your own. You have to find ways to get by here in Manila. It was hard adjusting. But after probably a month, I got used to it already.

If you were not a football player, what would you be doing now? I will be studying. Get my business degree then maybe I’ll go become a pilot. It’s been my dream as well.

Do you think the Azkals will survive without the Fil-foreigners? I think we also need the Fil-foreigners. They bring a lot of experience to the team. But skills-wise, I think the pureblooded Filipinos have it.

What was your initial reaction when you saw your team captain, Aly Borromeo’s billboard? Good for him. I’m happy for him. If you have that kind of body, why not flaunt it. Aly has been with the team for so long already, he really deserves all the attention and fame that he has been getting now. Same with Ian (Araneta), Chieffy (Caligdong) and Role (Gener). I’m closest to them and Yannick (Tuason).

Is there a player in the team that you get intimidated by? In football, if you get intimidated, nothing will happen to you. You have to be strong.
 
Published in the Manila Bulletin on July 20, 2011.

Rising Football Superstar of Cebu

THE rising football superstar of Cebu, Paolo Pascual, showed positive signs of making it to the pool of players who will compose either the senior team or the Under-23 squad of the Philippine National Football team.

The official announcement of the final list will be released today but Azkals team manager Dan Palami already confirmed that the remaining 13 hopefuls are part of the training pool.

 

Foto by Jazz Perez, Sports Unlimited

“The pool of players are already considered as part of the team,” Palami said. 

The Azkals coaching staff required the players to go through a series of practice games and trainings while waiting for the final list. 

“Paolo is performing well. He is training with other goal keepers and he will train with the national team as well,” he added. 

Only two goalkeepers will be sent to play for the upcoming match by the Philippine team against Mongolia and Neil Etheridge had already confirmed his presence. 

They will announce today who the other keeper will be. 

ABS-CBN will be the official broadcasting partner of the AFC Cup game in Bacolod this Feb. 9. 

Offers 

Meanwhile, while waiting for the final results of the tryout, Pascual received an offer to play with the Global FC. 

Global FC is a team under the APC Global Incorporated, which actively participates in the premier football leagues in the Philippines such as the United Football League. 

“He is young, trainable and has a good work ethic,” said Franco Lorenzo, team manager of Global FC. Lorenzo founded the team with Palami. 

They first noticed Pascual when the Cebuano became part of their training pool, who played for the Under-19 Asian Qualifiers in China in 2009 when he was still 17. 

Passion 

Lorenzo said he admired Pascual’s enthusiasm and passion for football and his willingness made him throw the offer to the aspiring professional football player. 

Pascual said he has not confirmed it yet. “I am is still weighing my options regarding the offer to play for Global FC. I still need to consult my parents,” said Pascual. 

Lorenzo offered him a monthly allowance and a slot in the trainings for the Under-23 team of Global FC. 

“I’m not forcing him because I know he still has obligations in Cebu and he still has to pursue his education but this is a good chance towards achieving his dream,” Lorenzo said. 

The young player is overwhelmed by the response of other football teams to his performance. 

“I feel so happy. It’s a good team with good players,” said Pascual. 

Lorenzo asked Pascual to watch the championship game today of the Global FC against the Army Team so that he will get to know the players and observe them. 

He already included Pascual in the list of players for the team’s next game. 

“There are a lot of options. I could go to school here and and train at the same time or I could go back to Cebu and come back whenever they have trainings for the under 23 but my priority would be playing for the Azkals,” Pascual said. 

Published in the Sun.Star Cebu newspaper on January 22, 2011.

Single-gender Schooling

The comparative benefits of single-sex and coeducational schooling have been much debated over the past 50 years. The proponents of single-sex education argue that boys and girls have differing needs and that their styles of learning are different. They point to data demonstrating the comparative under-performance of both boys and girls in co-ed classrooms. Proponents of coeducation argue that mixed education is more in keeping with the mores of modern Western society, and that children from co-ed schools are better adjusted. Both contend that their own approach is truly holistic.

The debate has a social component as well. Coeducation is sometimes regarded as a solution to the failure of the modern family to provide sufficiently for the effective socialization and moral development of children. The financial savings of using shared facilities have led governments to amalgamate formerly single-sex schools and open new co-ed schools, both public and private. In some countries governments have told independent schools to embrace coeducation or forfeit public funding.

A new element in the debate is widespread agreement that somehow education is failing boys. Boys are generally outperformed by girls; statistics of self harm and depression amongst boys are alarming; there seems to be a growing alienation of boys from their parents and fathers in particular. Psychologists write of the “father hunger” of boys who grow up without sufficient input from their natural father.

As Western society strives for gender equality, everyone has become more alert to the unfairness of discrimination on the basis of sex. This argument is used by both sides. Proponents of single-sex education argue that only through single-sex education are the specific needs of boys and girls met. Proponents of coeducation argue that coeducation ensures equity of access to educational facilities and courses. Single-sex education supporters reply that equality of the sexes does not necessitate identical provision for males and females, and that the best way of attending to the needs of boys and girls is to offer them facilities and courses that satisfy their unique requirements.

The advantages of single-sex education

Boys and girls are wired to learn in different ways
It seems beyond dispute that boys and girls learn at different paces and in different ways. This is not a matter of gender bias, but of experience verified time and again by psychological research. The view from the 1970s that gender traits are mere cultural constructs has been discredited. Cross-cultural studies over the past 30 years reveal that gender differences across the wide variety of cultures are remarkably constant1.

Here are some relevant differences. According to a 2001 study2, women use the right and left hemispheres of the brain to process language; men use only the left hemisphere. In general men are more likely to use one area of the brain for a given activity; women are more likely to use more of the brain. Studies show that women respond to directions that include data about what they will see and hear; men prefer abstract directions3 . Girls’ brains develop through adolescence so that girls are better able to discuss their feelings; boys’ brains do not. Research is revealing major physiological differences in the brains of even pre-adolescent boys and girls 4 . For example, seven-year-old girls hear better than boys 5.

These physical differences lead to differences in the way boys and girls learn. Teachers need to encourage girls, while boys need a reality check. Direct challenging works well with boys and they tend to respond to clear boundaries. Emotional activity is processed in a completely different part of the brain in older girls compared with older boys. It has been suggested that girls respond more innately to literature and that they more easily make links between ideas and emotions. In stories, girls tend to respond to nuances of character, boys to action 6. Role-playing exercises allowing a student to explore character work particularly well for girls. Inductive exercises allowing girls to act hypothetically also work well. There is evidence that boys respond more to structured lessons, finite tasks, and perhaps to the more abstract. Girls tend to respond more readily to group work and team work. One fascinating study suggests that under certain circumstances stress has a beneficial effect on male learning, but that it can impair the learning of a female, and that this characteristic is wired in the male brain from before birth7.

Most children learn better in a single-sex environment
On average, children in single-sex education outperform children of comparative ability in co-ed contexts. In a 20-year Australian study of 270,000 students, Ken Rowe found that both boys and girls performed between 15 and 22 percentile points higher on standardised tests when they attended single-sex schools.8  The National Foundation for Educational Research in England9  found that, even after controlling for student ability and other background factors, boys and girls performed significantly better academically in single-sex schools than in co-ed schools. Students in Jamaica attending single-sex schools outperformed students in co-ed schools in almost every subject tested.10  A 1997 study by Jean and Geoffrey Underwood showed that girl-girl pairings performed best on tasks, and that girl-boy pairings tended to depress the achievement of the girls involved.11 

Boys and girls experience the benefits of schooling in different ways. British studies suggest that females more than males benefit academically from single-sex education: they participate more in class, develop higher self esteem, score higher in aptitude tests, are more likely to choose sciences and other male domains at tertiary level, and are more successful in careers. Research suggests that boys dominate the classroom in a co-ed environment. Boys can behave more loudly. Some research has shown that girls receive fewer encouraging comments than boys in co-ed environments. Studies by Cornelius Riordan suggest that children from underprivileged backgrounds are the greatest beneficiaries of single-sex schooling.12  The message of all this research is simple: there are no differences in what girls and boys can learn, but here are big differences in the best way to teach them.

Single-sex education meets the needs of boys better
Boys and girls have different needs and education which respects personal differences must take this into account. On a practical level, the intuitively directed and affectively oriented styles of learning which suit most girls are not always compatible with the more structured and practical approaches which appeal to boys. Single-sex schooling allows teachers to tailor their teaching style to the boys and facilitates a more rounded educational experience. In a co-ed school, boys can opt out of curriculum areas where they would be out-performed.

Furthermore, there is evidence that mixed classrooms can discriminate against either boys and girls depending on the subject, the gender of the teacher, the teacher’s methodologies, and the prevailing culture in the school. Some schools have now started running single-sex classrooms in English and other humanities subjects to improve the performance of boys. The pilot study that demonstrated improved performance of boys in this context has been known as the Cotswold Experiment.13 

Single-sex education meets the needs of girls better
Single-sex education has clear benefits for girls. In the first place, it often gives them expanded educational opportunities by allowing them to pursue non-traditional disciplines for girls such as mathematics or science. Single-sex schooling also offers more opportunities to girls to exercise leadership. When girls and boys are in the same classroom, the boys tend to dominate and overshadow equally talented girls.

On an emotional level, single-sex education puts less pressure on girls, especially in adolescence. At that age, girls are more prone than boys to suffer from low self esteem. It is difficult to manage this issue in a co-ed climate when boys dominate in the classroom and when they receive more recognition, allowance for misbehaviour and encouragement.

Single-sex education makes greater provision for gender role modeling
The shortage of male teachers in the primary classroom is a concern in many countries. In the first six years of school, many boys in co-ed schools seldom encounter a male teacher. Because children imitate those they admire, it is common sense to ensure that boys and girls find in their teachers truly admirable role models. The example of professionalism, values and consistently positive behaviour is most important. But there are other aspects of example that are gender-specific. A boy learns what it means to be a man from his father, but this is reinforced if there are other admirable men in his life. This is also true for girls and their female teachers.

Single-sex schooling allows boys and girls to mature at their own pace
Girls mature earlier than boys: they are better behaved, more diligent and more sensible and they find it easier to relate to the adult world. For all these reasons, it is often argued that girls exert a civilising influence on boys. Whilst this may be true in some situation, the converse is also true: boys can uncivilise girls. When adolescent girls and boys study together, there is much evidence that a proportion will end up distracted from their work.

Single-sex schooling is often criticised for reinforcing negative images of masculinity. Unfortunately this can even happen in co-ed schools. The problem is not solved by bringing girls and boys together, but by vigilantly managing the culture in a school and sub-groups in the school.

Single-sex schooling does not handicap children socially
There is no evidence that children who have attended co-ed schools enter adult relationships that are more stable or fulfilling with the opposite sex. Assertions that children from co-ed backgrounds are better prepared for adult life seem to be flawed. There is a higher rate of unplanned pregnancies (and by implication, of terminated pregnancies) for girls in co-ed schools. One study has shown that students from single-sex schooling are not noticeably thwarted in the development of relationships with the opposite sex either at school or later at university.14

Coeducation can allow socialising to complicate intellectual development. Of course a positive school culture and the superior training of teachers can work against this. But it is difficult to protect impressionable young people from the images of precocious intimacy that saturate the media. Since emotional attraction and physical attraction works first of all at the level of physical proximity, there seems a strong argument to separate a teenager’s academic world from his or her social world. In a coeducational secondary classroom the lines between social life and school can become blurred. Single-sex education allows children to think about things “other than their hormones”.

Single-sex schooling makes it easier to be a good parent
Single-sex schools also provide parents with an opportunity to manage more effectively the social development of their children, particularly in the early years. It makes it easier for them to impart education about sexual matters in a way consistent with their values. Of course when parents choose to send their children to single-sex schools they will need to have much more initiative in providing for the social development of their children. They should set up many opportunities for boys to mix with girls in a family setting during childhood, well before they turn 14 or 15. It is very late to be starting to talk with a child about these issues once he or she has reached mid secondary school.

An undeniable problem for all families is the gulf between home life and a teenager’s social world. Children must feel they can bring their friends home. Coeducational schooling does little to help because it creates a social environment which is totally beyond the parents’ knowledge and largely outside their control. Unhappily when youth culture becomes divorced from family life, a certain percentage of children are sure to end up badly damaged.

Even if single-sex schooling is better for children, it demands more of their parents because they have to take responsibility for helping their children acquire mature social skills. It is easier for parents who send their children to co-ed schools to shirk this responsibility, even though this is not a task which can be delegated to anyone else. Indeed, the notion that parents can wash their hands of the problems of teenage social life may account for some of the popularity of co-ed education. But although relinquishing their leadership role might make parents’ lives easier, the children often suffer from their neglect. 

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Little Azkals open bid in AFC U-13 today

THE Philippine Under 13 (RP U13) tagged as the “Little Azkals” will open their campaign in the Asian Football Confederation (AFC) U13 Festival of Football today.

The team is composed of Major Dean Ebarle of the Abellana National School (ANS); Mario Lorenzo Ceniza of PAREF Springdale; Moiselle Angelo Alforque and Vincent Lobitos of Don Bosco Technology Center (DBTC); Kintaro Miyagi of Bright Academy; Lawrence Colina of the University of Southern Philippines Foundation (USPF); Lorenzo Genco; Yared Anton, Ian Daniel Eamague, Kyric Parao and Henry Hamdam of the Negros Oriental Football Association (NORFA); Mason Trent Vergara of Dumaguete City; Darios Diamante and Javier Romero-Salas of Davao FA; Sebastian Patangan of Dipolog FA; Jeremaih Borlongan and Dimitri Lionel Limbo of Cagayan de Oro-Misamis Oriental FA; Harel Dayan, Josh Albert Miller, John William Abraham, Ray Vincent Sanciangco and Marco Alessandro Casambre of the Rizal Football Association (RIFA).

First up for the Little Azkals will be Laos and Singapore this morning and Indonesia in the afternoon.

Team manager Richard Montayre explained that teams will play a total of 40 minutes with the first 11 of each team playing in the first 20 and the second 11 playing in the remaining 20 minutes.

On June 4 will be a skills test and matches will resume on Sunday and Monday. The Little Azkals coaching staff is made up of Oliver Colina as head coach, Eleazar Toledo as assistant coach, Noel Marcaida as goalkeeping coach and Eliezer Fabroada as coach instruct.

Marcaida said the target for the Little Azkals is to better the winless performance last year’s RP U14. 

/CORRESPONDENT MARS G. ALISON

Azkals to Award Inter-club Winners

By

Participating teams in the Cebu Amateur Football Club (CAFC) 11th National Interclub Football Cup will have an added incentive in vying for the championships. The Philippine national football team more famously known as the Azkals will be awarding the champions of the tournament during its closing ceremonies on May 29 at the football field of the University of San Carlos Technological Center (USC-TC).

The tournament kicks off today in various football pitches in Cebu City. In a final coaches meeting last Thursday night, CAFC president Glenn Quisido urged all teams to go for the title as they will not only have the privilege to be awarded by the Azkals but will also have the chance to share the stage with them and have their photos taken with the national team.

The Azkals will be having their one-week team bonding here in Cebu City as part of their preparation for the World Cup qualifiers. According to Quisido, they will arrive on May 25 and will immediately start their training. Quisido said he was grateful that the Azkals agreed to spare the CAFC one day. In exchange, the club will be partly supporting the national team’s stay in Cebu.

The CAFC will also help the Azkals in their fund-raising activity by selling official Azkals shirts during the week-long tournament. The CAFC will put up booths in the three playing venues—USC-TC, San Roque football field and Paref Springdale and sell the shirts starting today until May 29.

The tournament, considered one of the biggest outside Manila, has gathered teams from the Manila Soccer Academy, San Carlos City, Masbate, Iloilo, Ormoc, Bohol and Northern Samar.

In an effort to make the tournament flow more smoothly, CAFC has decided to schedule only two games in the morning and two games in the afternoon in all playing venues. And just like in the previous years, Quisido lamented the scarcity of girls teams in the tournament. “We have encouraged them to join the tournament, however, most refused because they said they cannot come up with 11 members to compromise a team,” Quisido said. The tournament though has three girls teams contesting the girls 17-Under title. These are Queen City United, Aroroy FC of Masbate and the USC-TC.