September 23, 2017

Forming character

ONE of the important goals of education is to form the character of children. It is that part of a person that provides stability and direction in his life and everything in it, starting with the way one thinks, his attitudes and his reactions to things in general.

A person, of course, is a very dynamic being, but he needs to have a sense of permanence and confidence. He needs to be rooted and moored in some sound foundations and oriented to some clear and good goals. He just cannot be drifting aimlessly, twisting in the wind.

A person needs to have an over-all view of life. He has to have a good idea of where he comes from and where he is supposed to go. He has to find meaning and purpose in everything. In fact, he has to know what man is really all about. In this, he cannot and should not be left in the dark for long.

Thus, we have to feel the need to be clear about who and what we are. This involves our core beliefs and faith. Let’s try to be professional and serious about this, avoiding being amateurish and sophomoric. And so we have to understand that we have to be committed to a global view of man and life.

For this, our Christian faith gives us the whole thing—from man’s creation to his eternal destiny. We have to be wary of some attractive ideologies that offer partial truths that often get distorted and exploited for some ulterior motives.

In short, we have to be committed to our Christian faith, for it contains the whole truth and mystery of man, and goes much further than any man-made ideology can offer. Commitment to our Christian faith should not remain on the intellectual level only. It has to involve our whole life with all our powers and faculties.

So everyone has to work to form the right character for oneself and for others. With respect to the children,  the task is a long, tedious process that has to go in several stages, typically slow, even meandering, in accordance to the rhythm of life itself, but it should be abiding and relentless.

Good knowledge on shifting gears is definitely a necessity here, since we are going to meet all kinds of terrains, challenges, circumstances and other factors and conditionings.

Since children are not aware of the need to form their own character, their parents and teachers have to gradually make them aware of it. In the end, it is the children themselves who are the primary agents in forming their own character.

The responsibility of the parents and teachers is undoubtedly big and indispensable, but at best secondary. To the children, parents are the primary educators. Teachers just help. Both need to coordinate very closely with each other.

For sure, they need to make time for this all-important duty. This cannot be treated as a sideline only. They need time to be with the children, and time for their planning and meetings.

For this reason, parents and teachers should be clear about what is involved in forming the character of the children. They have to know what education is really all about.

Then, of course, they have to know the many, endless details of the techniques and methods involved, when to be strict, when to be lenient, etc. They have to realize then that they need formation themselves and that their formation as educators also has to go on. It should be an endless affair.

For sure, education just cannot be understood as imparting some knowledge and skills to the children. It covers a whole lot more. Many considerations have to be made—the temperament and psychology of the children, the close monitoring of their behavior, etc.

As educators, parents and teachers have to be knowledgeable not only about the subjects involved in education, but also about the appropriate ways to educate children. They need to combine a wide range of qualities—patience, cheerfulness, toughness, optimism, naturalness, openness and flexibility, etc.

They have to be good at motivating, since children respond so favorably to this that we can say that their growth and development would depend largely on the motivation they receive especially from parents and children.

They have to feel appreciated and loved, needed and important. Even when they have to be corrected, they should realize by the way we do the correction that they are in fact loved and needed, never rejected.

This, I think, is how they form their character and acquire both human and Christian maturity.

Relucio, Pursuing excellence

“I have always believed that if you put in the work, the results will come. If you run into a wall, don't turn around and give up. Figure out how to climb it, go through it, or work around it.” Parents, teachers, school administration, members of the school board, guests, and the graduating class of 2012, good evening.

This powerful quote from the greatest basketball player of all time-Michael Jordan- – is what inspires me and Batch 2012 to strive for excellence in everything that we do, be it a simple or daunting task.

Take this speech for example. When I actually started writing it, I found out that it’s even harder to do than our Research Paper. Yet, one thing was certain though. I knew that the reason why I made it here today is that I never gave up in pursuing excellence. A line from the movie, “Three Idiots”, gave me the inspiration I needed. It goes, “Pursue excellence and success will just follow.”

So, it looks like… this is it! Finally, we have made it to the end of high school and I, personally, am very thankful to be part of this batch. As we are all gathered here to commemorate this important milestone in our lives, let us savor the fruits of our efforts. Without you guys, I wouldn’t be here and so this speech is not only mine, but yours as well.

Many consider us the best batch that Springdale has seen so far. We have heard it several times in elementary, only to hear the same thing again all throughout high school. And so with this, we went out to fulfill what everyone had expected of us. It propelled us to work harder and excel in academics, sports, and other extracurricular activities. Majority of us are on the director’s list, but… we’re not just a bunch of nerds. Almost everyone in the batch is part of the varsity and we have reaped numerous awards in soccer, basketball, taekwondo, debate, golf, swimming, cycling and even scrabble. That is what makes our batch truly amazing.

And guess what? We are also known as the guinea pigs of the school. Because of our high performance, we were always the first ones to try new things, like when they needed to change the curriculum. We didn’t see it as something bad because it just showed how much the school believed in us, making us a benchmark for other batches to emulate. And when we graduate, they will probably say things like “look at this batch and how much they have achieved.” Yes, these are just a few of our accomplishments that will definitely go down in Springdale history.

All these would not have been possible if not for those people who have been instrumental in helping us become what we are today: Our beloved parents and teachers. Our parents for their unwavering love and constant support, and our teachers for their deep wells of patience. In all our struggles, our parents have continued to serve as our guiding light to keep us going and stay focused on our goals. Without them, we might have gotten lost along the way.

Our heartfelt gratitude also goes out to all our teachers who have painstakingly handled our batch throughout the years. The experience we had during our Chemistry exhibits, when we were tasked to teach younger kids who did nothing but run around, made us realize how difficult it must be to be a teacher, especially to high school students who sometimes act like Grade 1 pupils.

Our teachers, together with our parents, have also instilled in us the love for God who makes all things possible. Nothing would have come to fruition without him. For all these, we cannot indeed, thank you enough.

Although we will be travelling different roads, hopefully, we will one day meet again and share new experiences and take pride in our lofty pursuits. Perhaps we will meet as Springdale parents. One of us may even be the chaplain of the school, or some may be influential business leaders in the community.

But no matter what path we take, we will forever be grateful for the wealth of experience that Springdale has provided for us. It has been a pleasure spending the last four years in high school with all of you. And because of the endless support from our parents and teachers, the hard work and never giving up on our goals, we have been better prepared for greater responsibilities ahead.

So, to the graduating class of 2012, let’s go out into the real world, take on new challenges, and show to everyone why we are the best batch of Springdale! – Graduation Speech by Alfredo Relucio Jr, Batch 2012

Igimax: love your sport, make it your passion

Mr. Ampiloquio, Dr. Payod, Mr. Mendoza, Mr. Rosal, Mr. Cabuguas, teachers and staff
My dear parents and friends… 
My fellow awardees… 

Sport teaches me a lot of things. Allow me to share them with you especially to the younger Titans.

The first one is to love your sport. Never do it to please someone else. It has to be your choice… it has to be your passion.

Defeats are like fire. It can destroy or strengthen you, depending on your outlook in life. But remember, the fire that melts the butter is the same fire that hardens the steel.

Champions are not made in the gym. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them – a desire, a dream, a vision.

The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary. And remember, when you are not practicing, someone, somewhere, is practicing and when you meet him, he will win. This goes to show how important hard work and sacrifice is.

Being a student and an athlete at the same time is not easy … it takes a lot of hard work, sacrifice, determination and proper time management on both our school work and training schedules. We could not have done this without the support of our parents and our school, PAREF Springdale.

In behalf of all the awardees, let me thank our school for giving us the opportunity to learn things outside the four walls of our classrooms. You encourage us to explore on extra-curricular activities such as sports, without having to give up on our academics. Your all-out support and understanding by excusing us from our classes yet allowing us to make up for our absences is such a privilege that not all student-athletes from other schools enjoy. This is probably the reason why most of us, Springdale athletes, if not all, excel in our sports.

We learned how to balance both our chosen sport and our studies. We thank you, teachers, for shaping our character and making us the kind of student-athletes that we are today. We really appreciate and will forever be grateful for the opportunities you opened up for us not only academically but also in the field of sports. And of course, to all our parents, we thank you for your unconditional love. Thank you for the support and sacrifices you have given us to make things possible and for always being there for us, no matter what.

Let me end this by sharing with you my “3 Simple Rules in Life”:

– If you do not GO after what you want … you will never have it. 
– If you do not ASK … the answer will always be a no. 
– If you do not step FORWARD … you will always be in the same place.

Learn to TAKE risks … and see where your brave heart can take you!

God bless the Titans! Good evening.

Athlete's Night Address by Luis Miguel "IgiMax" Maximo, Philippine Cycling Team

Speaking Out To Win

Courtesy photo by Ribo HolganzaMANILA, Philippines — At the recent World Schools Debating Championships (WSDC), touted as the Olympics of debate, Team Philippines was the most watched and was considered one of the best and strongest teams to beat, alongside European countries which have long dominated the tournament.

It’s because six Filipino high school students made history by emerging among the top four teams, alongside Scotland, Wales and England in the WSDC tournament held last month in Cape Town, South Africa.

The team was composed of Mariella Antoinette Salazar from International School Manila, Joaquin Maria Bonoan Escano from PAREF Southridge School, Donald Felbaum and Nico Lorenzo Flaminiano from Xavier School, Rico Rey Francis Holganza, Jr. from PAREF Springdale School in Cebu, and Sanjeev Parmanand from Ateneo de Zamboanga University High School.

They breezed through eight preliminary rounds of debates with six wins, and then went on to defeat Team Canada in the first round of the finals with a two to one decision, and then Team Singapore in the quarter-finals with a unanimous vote or a 5-0 score.

The team, however, was narrowly defeated in the semi-finals by Scotland.

Making it to the semi-finals was the farthest place any Philippine team has gone to in the competition. The closest it got in past WSDC tournaments was the top 16 ranking in 2009, followed by the 20th slot last year.

Team member Mariella Salazar says Team Philippines also earned high speaker points during the quarterfinals from top caliber judges.

UNEXPECTED WIN ON A CONTROVERSIAL TOPIC

Despite giving their best performance, the members didn’t really expect to defeat the big teams Canada and Singapore, 2010 and 2011 WSDC champions respectively. In fact, they only realized they were winning when the chief adjudicator was already explaining the merits of their arguments, and announced their victory!

Among the motions or topics discussed during their debates include socio economic rights, the ban on religious parties from running, rural urban migration, Arab Spring, and a feminist movement’s ban on pornography.

For Rico Holganza, Jr. of PAREF Springdale School, what sealed their win against Singapore was the motion which was really close to home, about believing that the gay rights movement should out gay celebrities.

"Team Singapore which was in favor of this motion argued that these gay celebrities who are public figures don’t have a right to privacy because they use their personality to market their brand or products. It runs counter to their values to be closeted gays because it’s deceptive. It's like false advertising. They also said they want to out these celebrities so they can be a model for gay children in conservative societies," says Nico Flaminiano of Xavier School.

But the Philippine team, who cited Hollywood and local gay celebrities in their arguments, maintained that these persons should still have some level of privacy and that they be given the freedom to come out by themselves in their own time and if they want to.

"We argued that some people are successful in creating a dichotomy between their public and private lives. This is very important in trying to protect their party, their children, family and friends from harm. We told them it's also very dangerous to mix public and private life," explains Nico.

Mariella, on the other hand, raised the issue of fragmentation between the movement itself and how outing gay celebrities is counterproductive to the movement.

"Instead of finding inspiration in this gay celebrities and making them role models, what it actually does is alienate certain people. It's like a witchhunt! You don’t have that level of scrutiny with the straight people then why do you want to have that level of scrutiny with gay people? Besides, many celebrities are happy with their lives and don’t even have to come out because they're already accepted,” she adds.

More than the arguments though, Donald Felbaum of Xavier School believes their responsiveness to the issues was what really got the judges on their side. “Both teams were really good. We just edged them out on the criteria of responsiveness and I think that's what sealed the debate more than anything," he notes.

FROM UNDERDOGS TO TEAM FAVORITE

In the earlier part of the tournament, Joaquin Escano of Southridge School says they were among the underdogs. People didn’t expect them to make it that far.

Thus when they advanced to the quarters and semi finals, the other teams began to take notice of their performance. Everyone wanted to watch them perform.

“The best feeling I had there was when we got off the bus and everybody cheered, congratulating us for beating Canada. They told us that we were the talk of the tournament. They even compared us to the Cinderella story, like we were the giant slayers!” Rico enthuses.

For Mariella, the most memorable part of the debates was when the judges announced that they won and the whole room got wild. “Our friends from Peru and Argentina started shouting Filipino, Filipino! They said we were friends with the Philippines before they even got famous!”

Joaquin cited their friendly nature as another reason for the team’s popularity in WSDC. Contrary to perception that debaters are out for the kill, he says that even when they aim for the win, teams still engage in a friendly match. Competing against a team, he adds, is one of the easiest ways to make friends with them.

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