July 22, 2017

IGIMAX makes waves in Tour of Bohol

CEBU, Philippines – Promising Cebuano junior cyclist Luis Miguel "Igimax" Maximo of YKKBikes bagged the juniors title in Stage 1 of the 90-kilometer Tour of Bohol over the weekend.

The 16-year-old Igimax, a fourth year high school student and Student Council President of PAREF Springdale, finished the lung-busting race in two hours, 53 minutes and 23 seconds.

Foto grabbed from Igi's Facebook

"It was a tough race for me. I was behind by 33 minutes from the overall winner and that is a big gap in our sport. I could have done better if not for a stomach upset (hyper acidity) during race day," said the Sportswriters Association of Cebu (SAC) awardee.

It was also the first time that Igimax made use of his new equipment courtesy of Fizin, an Italian cycling company which is the lalest addition to his growing list of corporate backers.

"What I like most about the race is that I was able to try my new equipment provided by Fizik and YKK. The Fizik saddle is very comfortable to sit on even if you have to ride 90 kilometers," Igimax said.

Another Cebuano rider and The Freeman columnist JV Araneta also made a good showing as he landed at eighth place in the men's open category 4 with the time of two hours, 27 minutes and 48 seconds.

The tough race was participated in by amateur and executive cyclists from Manila, Luzon, Cebu, Bohol and other cities.

It was sponsored by the 3rd District of Bohol under Rep. Arthur Yap and Loay Mayor Rose Imboy and organized by Bike King Phils., a Manila-based sports event firm headed by Raul Cuevas.

Published in the FREEMAN on September 28, 2011.

Restored Rizal’s works at the National Library starting June 19

By Gian Geronimo, VERA Files

The celebration of the 150th birth anniversary of Dr. Jose Rizal on June 19 becomes more meaningful because the public will be able to view the original manuscripts of his famous novels, Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo, at the National Library, courtesy of the German conservators who have meticulously restored the national hero's works.

Aside from "Noli" and "Fili," the conservators worked on Guillermo Tell, Rizal's translation of Friedrich Schiller's William Tell.

The project of restoring Rizal's works is a joint project of the National Library of the Philippines and the German government.

"The ultimate objective (of the restoration project) is to leave a legacy to another generation," said NLP Director Antonio M. Santos.

Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo, scathing commentaries of the Spanish colonial rule of the Philippines, inspired a nationalist revolution and caused the execution by firing squad of Rizal on Dec. 30, 1896.

The restoration project is more than three years in the making, when it was first conceptualized in 2007 by the NLP's then director Prudenciana Cruz as a joint undertaking with Germany where Rizal studied and wrote the two novels. The first copies of Noli Me Tangere were published in Berlin in 1887.

Rizal also has a statue in his honor in the German town of Wilhelmsfeld, where he met Pastor Karl Ullmer who opened his home to him. Ullmer's grandson Fritz donated the Ullmer Collection to the country in 1961, which includes letters and sketches by Rizal.

The Department of Budget and Management gave P2 million as seed fund for the library's conservation room, furnished with basic tools and equipment used by German restorers Monika Gast and Katrin Hüpeden.

"We established the Conservation Center to mark the first major step in achieving a better storage condition and a better preservation program for the posterity of our collections," Anne Rosette Crelencia, NLP Rare Books and Manuscripts head, said.

The Philippine government acquired Noli Me Tangere in 1911 along with other manuscripts by Rizal for P32,000. El Filibusterismo was acquired in 1925 for P10,000.

In January 1945, during World War II, the manuscripts were stored in vaults in the Manila City Hall but were found to have been looted during the Battle for the Liberation of Manila that started in February that year.

Efforts to retrieve the manuscripts bore fruit in April 1946 when a messenger of an unidentified individual offered to return the manuscripts on the following conditions: The individual would not be identified, no questions about the return would be asked, and no publicity regarding the return.

The NLP recovered 106 out of 120 stolen manuscripts. In 1953, the Spanish government also donated manuscripts of Rizal in its possession to the country. Rizal's manuscripts are kept in three vaults in the Rare Books and Manuscripts section.

Conservation, according to Crelencia, has a bigger scope than restoration.