April 25, 2017

Back to Springdale

As "the only school for boys", today is the first day in school at PAREF Springdale. Teachers, staffs, and students are excited. Everyone is excited especially the new ones. You see new faces, new smiles, hear new laughter, and new kids playing at the quadrangle. For more than 16 years already as a boys school here in Cebu…

…in Springdale, you see "Gentlemen".

Bene Omnia Facere!

Cebuano cyclist Igi Maximo is youngest member of Philippine Team

Courtesy photo by Maximax

Sixteen-year-old Cebuano junior cyclist Luis Miguel “Igi” Maximo achieved a long-standing dream of his as he was named to the Philippine cycling team, becoming its youngest member and the only junior cyclist from the Visayas and Mindanao.

PhilCycling, the UCI-recognized National Sports Association of cycling in the country headed by Mayor Abraham Tolentino, conducted two nationwide qualifying rounds for the National Junior Trials.

In the Tour of Clark last Nov. 26-27 in Clark, Pampanga, which served as the preliminary round for Juniors 16-17, Maximo finished in second place in the Individual Time Trial (ITT) 10km and third overall in the General Classification standings.

In the Tagaytay Trials last Dec. 12, in spite of travel fatigue and pressure from school commitments, he delivered a sixth place finish in the Individual Time Trial (ITT) 30km among the 22 aspiring cyclists.

“I did not expect it will come this soon. I was up against older riders during the Trials, all I wished for was a slot in the national training pool,” said Maximo. “Cyclists from Pangasinan and Central Luzon—known hotbeds of cycling in the country—were strong. The top-of-the-line cycling racing equipment provided by Cebu-based YKK Trading really made the big difference in the race,” added Maximo.

As part of the Philippine National Junior Team, Maximo is now in the shortlist for inclusion into the country’s participation in the 2012 Asian Juniors Cycling Championships this coming Feb. 8 to 18 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Published in the Cebu Daily News on January 3, 2012 by Jonas Panerio, CDN.

Tonyo Carcel shines in Kartzone return

CEBU, Philippines – Juan Antonio “Tonyo” Carcel could not help but be sentimental as he reigned supreme in the 8th leg of the 2011 Kartzone Karting Series at Kartzone over the weekend. 

The 15-year-old Carcel made a good comeback in the national scene and was supposed to race in Clark, Pampanga earlier this month but the event was cancelled due to bad weather.

So that his preparations won't go to waste, Carcel decided to return to Kartzone after three years of missing in action.

Carcel readily made an impact by lording it over in the formula SL experts class.

Peterson Lim came in second followed by Daniel Miranda, Jette Calderon and Panpan Reroma.

“I found it fun that I came back to Kartzone, the track that I grew up in. I started racing here when I was only 10 years old.

This track will forever be in my heart, I will never forget it,” Carcel ended.

(Contributed Photo)

Published in the Freeman on November 15, 2011.

PAREF junior gets in national debate team

RICO Rey Francis Holganza, a 16-year-old junior, made it to the Philippine national secondary debate team after a weekend of gruelling tryouts.

The Team Philippines: World Schools Debate Championships committee came to Cebu last Dec. 18 and 19 and hosted a tryouts session at the University of the Philippines Cebu College campus.

Holganza, or Ribo as his friends call him, was chosen by Kip Oebanda and James Soriano, head coaches of the team, after several rounds of debate where six other Springdale students participated.

He will be sent to Dundee, Scotland, on August and to Cape Town, South Africa, on February to compete in two editions of World Schools Debate Championships.

Four of six slots in the team have been taken by Holganza, Joaquin Escaño from PAREF Southridge School, Sanjeev Parmanand from the Ateneo de Zamboanga University, Akshar Bonu and Mariella Salazar from the International School of Manila.

Practice was intense because it would last until four in the morning, but it was all worthwhile,? Holganza said.

The team has been competing regularly for the past few years, but this is the first time the committee hosted tryouts outside of Metro Manila, making Holganza's accomplishment an even bigger one.

Published in the Inquirer Global Nation on March 29, 2011.

 

Pages: Gio Gandionco’s dream: ‘Be like Rory’

By John Pages

TIGER Woods is outdated and passé. Today’s young golfers want to be like the 22-year-old Irish champion of the United States Open.

Take the son of Opep and Cora Gandionco. Only 16 years old, he possesses the confidence and maturity of Rory McIlroy.

Angelo Jose “Gio” Gandionco explained: “Rory inspired me to do better and to challenge myself; if Rory can do it, why can’t I? It may be tough to be the best or even get in the PGA Tour but if you have the will and desire, you can achieve it. Rory winning made me realize that it’s possible to win one of the biggest tournaments and beat the best. Like now, I’m touring America playing tournaments and I’m up against the best juniors. I know if I play my game I can beat them like Rory. If I focus on what I’m supposed to do and not get intimidated, I can win.”

Spunk, spirit, and self-assurance.

That’s Gio.

From the U.S., he e-mailed last week. “I just finished my first tournament this second trip here,” said Gio. “It’s the AJGA (American Junior Golf Association) Club Corp Mission Hills Desert Junior in Rancho Mirage (Palm Springs), California. Despite jet lag since I just arrived three days earlier and playing in 114-degree weather, I finished second with a score of 71-73-72, which is my best finish so far here. Most of the other players were from California. LJ Go (from Cebu) also played.”

Gio, a 2-handicapper who also idolizes Rickie Fowler (“He stands out with his fashion statement”), travels next to Pinehurst, North Carolina and Huntsville, Alabama. He then returns home to Cebu, where he is a fourth year high school student at Paref-Springdale (and a five-time Student Athlete Of The Year).

“Last April,” he added, “my mom’s family had a reunion in Hawaii so we went on to Texas to join a tournament at the Texas A&M University. I finished 14th (that was a highly-ranked junior event) and, at the PGA Golf Club in Florida, I finished in the top 10. Here in the U.S., there are 5,000 junior golf players… so I think I have been doing well.”

Gio started golf at the age of four. He used Little Tikes plastic golf clubs and his dad, Opep, who heads the family-owned giant Julie’s Bakeshop, was the person who taught his son how to swing.

By age 7, Gio joined golf events. But, he also had a similar interest in the Azkals game of football. He was Springdale’s striker. Finally, he had to choose. “When my soccer tournaments and golf coach’s schedules competed for my time,” he said, “I knew I had to make a choice. Although I enjoyed the team play in soccer with my friends, I knew it was golf I really loved! So at 11, I started to seriously work on my game.”

Mixing academics and sport has not been easy. “My schedule is very hectic,” said Gio, an honor student who consistently averages 90+. “But, I always try to put time for both practicing and studying. During schooldays, I get dismissed 4:30pm so I head to either the range or the golf course on MWF. On Tuesdays and Thursdays, I work out in the gym. I get home 6:30pm, study, eat, sleep. It is not easy being a student-athlete; you have to learn how to manage your time well. Even while I’m away for a tournament, I still have to read books and do homework to prepare for tests.”

Gio’s dream? To play in the PGA Tour. But first, he says, “My goal in the medium term is to get a scholarship at a prestigious U.S. university. I would like to play college golf, at the same time graduate with a degree in Business.”

His best score? A 5-under par in a Men’s Amateur tournament late last year. “Although I am still working on my game,” he says, “my short game has always been my strength.

Every aspect of my game is still a work-in-progress, and I am open to learning and improving.”

As to the aspects of golf that he enjoys most, he answers, “I love every part of the game: the pressure, the challenge, the intimidation, the hard work, the difficulties that come everyday and, most of all, the feeling of knowing you’re improving.”

Only 16, Gio sounds like a very, very mature person.

Just like Rory.

Published in the Sun.Star Cebu on July 7, 2011.

“There Be Dragons”

When you step inside a movie theater, you never know what’s going to happen… there in the dark, for an hour or two. A movie is a powerful thing, and There Be Dragons has already demonstrated the power to change the lives not only of viewers but also of actors. 

St Josemaria's life, like everyone else's, was made up of light and shadows. Through the whole of it his overwhelming desire was to be faithful to where God was taking him. This makes him a brilliant guide for others in the dark moments of their lives.

Charlie Cox himself, who plays St. Josemaría in the movie, told reporters: “My relationship with the Catholic Church and with God has certainly been profoundly affected for the better throughout this process.”

People have been writing personal testimonies to the website of St Josemaria Institute, describing the impact that the film had on their lives. Here are a few:

“I've been trying to forgive my mother all my life (…). On May 6 the topic of my therapy session was finding a way to forgive her, and that night I saw There Be Dragons. I chose to ask for St. Josemaria's intercessions, and since then, I have had nothing but good memories of her. I AM FREE of my dragon!!!” Cynthia

I leave wanting to be a better person
"Thank you, Roland Joffé. You have managed that a person, at the end of the film, is left with desires to be a better person and with the clear idea that it is not worth letting yourself be carried away by your passions. To behave in a decent, human way will at times lead to suffering, and acting badly perhaps has some advantages and saves you some blows in life . . . but it is not worth it. Thank you for this beautiful film.-José Ignacio

“Gentlemen: I am writing to thank you for having made this film. A few weeks ago I called a friend of mine to tell him that my wife and I had decided to divorce. We have a daughter. This friend told me: "Before you do that, you have to watch There Be Dragons." I went to see the movie with my wife, accompanied by this friend. We left the theater crying and unable to speak. We spent all that night talking about it, because we realized that the problem was not in our relationship as husband and wife, but that we had not been able to identify and overcome our own inner dragons. The real problems were in each one of us. So we have decided to focus our struggles on that, to overcome our dragons, and not to talk about divorce any more. We have also decided to try to have a new child.” Enrique Lorenzo

For more messages from viewers here