September 23, 2017

Forming character

ONE of the important goals of education is to form the character of children. It is that part of a person that provides stability and direction in his life and everything in it, starting with the way one thinks, his attitudes and his reactions to things in general.

A person, of course, is a very dynamic being, but he needs to have a sense of permanence and confidence. He needs to be rooted and moored in some sound foundations and oriented to some clear and good goals. He just cannot be drifting aimlessly, twisting in the wind.

A person needs to have an over-all view of life. He has to have a good idea of where he comes from and where he is supposed to go. He has to find meaning and purpose in everything. In fact, he has to know what man is really all about. In this, he cannot and should not be left in the dark for long.

Thus, we have to feel the need to be clear about who and what we are. This involves our core beliefs and faith. Let’s try to be professional and serious about this, avoiding being amateurish and sophomoric. And so we have to understand that we have to be committed to a global view of man and life.

For this, our Christian faith gives us the whole thing—from man’s creation to his eternal destiny. We have to be wary of some attractive ideologies that offer partial truths that often get distorted and exploited for some ulterior motives.

In short, we have to be committed to our Christian faith, for it contains the whole truth and mystery of man, and goes much further than any man-made ideology can offer. Commitment to our Christian faith should not remain on the intellectual level only. It has to involve our whole life with all our powers and faculties.

So everyone has to work to form the right character for oneself and for others. With respect to the children,  the task is a long, tedious process that has to go in several stages, typically slow, even meandering, in accordance to the rhythm of life itself, but it should be abiding and relentless.

Good knowledge on shifting gears is definitely a necessity here, since we are going to meet all kinds of terrains, challenges, circumstances and other factors and conditionings.

Since children are not aware of the need to form their own character, their parents and teachers have to gradually make them aware of it. In the end, it is the children themselves who are the primary agents in forming their own character.

The responsibility of the parents and teachers is undoubtedly big and indispensable, but at best secondary. To the children, parents are the primary educators. Teachers just help. Both need to coordinate very closely with each other.

For sure, they need to make time for this all-important duty. This cannot be treated as a sideline only. They need time to be with the children, and time for their planning and meetings.

For this reason, parents and teachers should be clear about what is involved in forming the character of the children. They have to know what education is really all about.

Then, of course, they have to know the many, endless details of the techniques and methods involved, when to be strict, when to be lenient, etc. They have to realize then that they need formation themselves and that their formation as educators also has to go on. It should be an endless affair.

For sure, education just cannot be understood as imparting some knowledge and skills to the children. It covers a whole lot more. Many considerations have to be made—the temperament and psychology of the children, the close monitoring of their behavior, etc.

As educators, parents and teachers have to be knowledgeable not only about the subjects involved in education, but also about the appropriate ways to educate children. They need to combine a wide range of qualities—patience, cheerfulness, toughness, optimism, naturalness, openness and flexibility, etc.

They have to be good at motivating, since children respond so favorably to this that we can say that their growth and development would depend largely on the motivation they receive especially from parents and children.

They have to feel appreciated and loved, needed and important. Even when they have to be corrected, they should realize by the way we do the correction that they are in fact loved and needed, never rejected.

This, I think, is how they form their character and acquire both human and Christian maturity.

Igimax: love your sport, make it your passion

Mr. Ampiloquio, Dr. Payod, Mr. Mendoza, Mr. Rosal, Mr. Cabuguas, teachers and staff
My dear parents and friends… 
My fellow awardees… 

Sport teaches me a lot of things. Allow me to share them with you especially to the younger Titans.

The first one is to love your sport. Never do it to please someone else. It has to be your choice… it has to be your passion.

Defeats are like fire. It can destroy or strengthen you, depending on your outlook in life. But remember, the fire that melts the butter is the same fire that hardens the steel.

Champions are not made in the gym. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them – a desire, a dream, a vision.

The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary. And remember, when you are not practicing, someone, somewhere, is practicing and when you meet him, he will win. This goes to show how important hard work and sacrifice is.

Being a student and an athlete at the same time is not easy … it takes a lot of hard work, sacrifice, determination and proper time management on both our school work and training schedules. We could not have done this without the support of our parents and our school, PAREF Springdale.

In behalf of all the awardees, let me thank our school for giving us the opportunity to learn things outside the four walls of our classrooms. You encourage us to explore on extra-curricular activities such as sports, without having to give up on our academics. Your all-out support and understanding by excusing us from our classes yet allowing us to make up for our absences is such a privilege that not all student-athletes from other schools enjoy. This is probably the reason why most of us, Springdale athletes, if not all, excel in our sports.

We learned how to balance both our chosen sport and our studies. We thank you, teachers, for shaping our character and making us the kind of student-athletes that we are today. We really appreciate and will forever be grateful for the opportunities you opened up for us not only academically but also in the field of sports. And of course, to all our parents, we thank you for your unconditional love. Thank you for the support and sacrifices you have given us to make things possible and for always being there for us, no matter what.

Let me end this by sharing with you my “3 Simple Rules in Life”:

– If you do not GO after what you want … you will never have it. 
– If you do not ASK … the answer will always be a no. 
– If you do not step FORWARD … you will always be in the same place.

Learn to TAKE risks … and see where your brave heart can take you!

God bless the Titans! Good evening.

Athlete's Night Address by Luis Miguel "IgiMax" Maximo, Philippine Cycling Team

Team Philippines among the Top Four in 2012 World Schools Debating Championships

Six Philippine high school students made history by reaching the World Schools Debating Championships (WSDC) semi-final in Cape Town, South Africa in January this year, thereby emerging among the top four teams of the tournament. 

Foto / Sharmila Parmanand

Cape Town, Africa. Foto / Sharmila Parmanand

Having participated since 2002, this was the furthest that any team from the Philippines had ever progressed. The team, composed of Joaquin Maria Bonoan Escano from PAREF Southridge School, Donald Felbaum and Nico Lorenzo Flaminiano from Xavier School, Rico Rey Francis Holganza, Jr., from PAREF Springdale School in Cebu, Sanjeev Parmanand from Ateneo de Zamboanga University High School, and Mariella Antoinette Salazar from International School Manila, finished 8th after 8 preliminary rounds of debating, with 6 wins – the highest ever for a team from the Philippines.

Education Secretary Br. Armin Luistro FSC extends his greetings to the Philippine team for the honor they have brought to the country. “I am truly pleased with the convergence of young people from different parts of the world to share their opinions on issues affecting their respective countries locally and globally. But more importantly, hats off to the Philippine team for showing the world the great potential of Filipino students,” said Luistro.

He added that the competition has been a golden opportunity for the world to hear and understand the youth’s views on topics that are often discussed only by the older generation – when the issues discussed shall most certainly affect the younger generation.

The team proved to be the tournament’s surprise package, earning the respect of judges and coaches all over the world, as they went on to defeat Canada (2010 champions) in the first round of the finals, and Singapore (2011 champions) in the quarter-finals. They were narrowly defeated in the semi-finals by eventual champions Scotland.

“The team put in a great amount of work, researching topics and practicing their debating, along with having to manage their schoolwork, and it’s good to see their effort and dedication rewarded,” said Sharmila Parmanand, a three-time Asian Champion debater and former member of the Ateneo de Manila Debate Society, who served as coach this year.

Kip Oebanda, a Philippine national champion and two-time Asian semi-finalist, who coached the Philippine team for the previous two championships, noted that this was the first team to field speakers from outside Manila, with a speaker each from Visayas and Mindanao.

“It’s exciting to see debate spreading across the country,” he said.

Source: http://deped.net/team-philippines-among-the-top-four-in-2012-world-schools-debating-championships.html

A Unique Outreach

With outreach programs traditionally practiced during the Christmas season, seventy select students of Bonbon Elementary School in Cebu City became beneficiaries of a one-of-a-kind outreach program. 

The outreach on January 2, 2012 was organized by Dream Foundation led by PAREF Springdale Alumnus & Philippine Azkal Player, Paolo Pascual, and Miss Earth Philippines-Water 2011, Murielle Adrienne Orais. Some alumni of PAREF Springdale Batch 2008 and 2007, and friends joined them. 

It doesn't come as a surprise why Bonbon was chosen as the venue. It's because Paolo's high school batch of 2008 pioneered the outreach in Bonbon Elementary School during their senior year. Since then, Bonbon Elementary School officially became an adopted-school of PAREF Springdale School with already three work missions organized by subsequent batches.

At exactly 10:40 AM, the activity started with a short introduction of the team members. Fun games were played that broke the ice and created a bonding between the kids and the Dream Foundation Team; filling the school with loud cheers and laughter. The pupils were then treated to lunch and gifts. 

Notwithstanding the celebrity status of Muriel and Paolo, the short program was without any press.

They’ve both implied that the children’s smiles and their simple “thank you’s” are in themselves PRICELESS! Their example reminds one of a proverbial phrase, “But when you are giving in charity, let not your left hand perceive what your right hand is doing.”

Text by Choy Tura

Paolo Pascual: Being a part of the Azkals is a very, very big achievement

MANILA, Philippines — Yannick Tuason and Paolo Pascual leave everything behind for the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to play with the Azkals.

Paolo Pascual, goalkeeper: The other ‘Papa P’

He may not be Piolo, but Paolo Pascual now has his fair share of crazy, adoring fans since joining the Azkals as one of its newest homegrown recruits.

Paolo and the rest of the U-23 (Under 23) players are currently preparing for the Southeast Asian Games in November in Indonesia where he will be the first goalkeeper.

He is also getting back to fighting form after he dislocated his shoulder almost two months ago.
 
Photo grabbed with permission from Paolo's Facebook.

Paolo was just a regular Business and Entrepreneurship college junior at the University of San Carlos in Cebu when he got a call from the Philippine Football Federation asking him to try out for the Azkals.

While it’s already an achievement to try out with other experienced and talented players who come from the other parts of the globe, what sets Paolo apart is the fact that he made it to the national team at only 20 years old. The 5’11” Cebuano native has been training with the Azkals since January.

Paolo started playing football when he was seven years old at Paref Springdale School. He was a striker until Grade VII when his coach Mario Ceniza realized Paolo had the potential to be a good goalkeeper given his height. He has since played in Global Smartmatic FC and in the Philippine U-19 team that competed in China.

Paolo is supposed to be in fourth year college now, but because most of the trainings are conducted in Manila, he is now looking for a school in the capital city where he can continue his studies while he attends the national team trainings at the same time.

Even if he is away from home, Paolo relates that he is always reminded by his father to “always be an intelligent athlete” by balancing academics and sports.

How did you get into football? I started when I was seven years old, for school. Since then, I’ve been playing football in elementary, high school and college. It has always been my childhood dream to play football.

Who are your football idols? Being a goalkeeper, I look up to Iker Casillas. Locally, I look up to my partner, Eduard Sacapano. He has a good work ethic and he has been with the team for so long so I think he deserves to get noticed, he deserves credit.

How would you describe yourself as a player? A goalkeeper should have discipline and a good work ethic. You shouldn’t give up. Even up to the last minute, you should give it your all. Neil Etheridge gives us a lot of tips. When he’s here, he trains us. He’s got a lot of really, really good and useful tips.

What type of a student are you? I’m silent, kinda studious and friendly.

Was it a tough decision choosing between school and being part of the national football team? It is football for now. But I know you can’t get a living by just doing football. You have to earn after football also. So you need a college degree and all that to go through with life. I talked to my mom and dad about it first and I told them that this is just a once-in-alifetime experience. My parents have been very supportive. They’re the ones who have been encouraging me to join the Azkals.

Who inspires you during a game? Number one is God. Next is ‘yung mga na-achieve nung veteran teammates namin, all the Pinoys who have been with the Azkals ever since, like Roel Gener. Their dedication to the team and to the country is amazing.

Do you have any rituals before a game? I just pray.

How has football changed your life? Now that we’re part of the team, you should be more conscious about your health. That’s something to focus on.

What do you consider is your biggest achievement so far? I think being a part of the Azkals is a very, very big achievement already.

What was your craziest experience with a fan? In Barotac (Iloilo) it is pretty wild. The crowd there is rowdy compared to Manila. Here kasi, they keep things to themselves. There they would, they release. They do anything.

Are you single or in a relationship? I’m single.

What do you look for in a girlfriend? I like someone who is God-fearing and family-oriented.

The biggest sacrifice that you have to make as an Azkal? Being away from the family. I’m from Cebu and to move here to Manila is a big sacrifice for me.

What was the biggest adjustment for you coming from Cebu? The life and the family. Homesickness. In Cebu, I have everything there, you have a home, you’re family is there for you. But here, you have to be independent. You have to learn how to live on your own. You have to find ways to get by here in Manila. It was hard adjusting. But after probably a month, I got used to it already.

If you were not a football player, what would you be doing now? I will be studying. Get my business degree then maybe I’ll go become a pilot. It’s been my dream as well.

Do you think the Azkals will survive without the Fil-foreigners? I think we also need the Fil-foreigners. They bring a lot of experience to the team. But skills-wise, I think the pureblooded Filipinos have it.

What was your initial reaction when you saw your team captain, Aly Borromeo’s billboard? Good for him. I’m happy for him. If you have that kind of body, why not flaunt it. Aly has been with the team for so long already, he really deserves all the attention and fame that he has been getting now. Same with Ian (Araneta), Chieffy (Caligdong) and Role (Gener). I’m closest to them and Yannick (Tuason).

Is there a player in the team that you get intimidated by? In football, if you get intimidated, nothing will happen to you. You have to be strong.
 
Published in the Manila Bulletin on July 20, 2011.

Rising Football Superstar of Cebu

THE rising football superstar of Cebu, Paolo Pascual, showed positive signs of making it to the pool of players who will compose either the senior team or the Under-23 squad of the Philippine National Football team.

The official announcement of the final list will be released today but Azkals team manager Dan Palami already confirmed that the remaining 13 hopefuls are part of the training pool.

 

Foto by Jazz Perez, Sports Unlimited

“The pool of players are already considered as part of the team,” Palami said. 

The Azkals coaching staff required the players to go through a series of practice games and trainings while waiting for the final list. 

“Paolo is performing well. He is training with other goal keepers and he will train with the national team as well,” he added. 

Only two goalkeepers will be sent to play for the upcoming match by the Philippine team against Mongolia and Neil Etheridge had already confirmed his presence. 

They will announce today who the other keeper will be. 

ABS-CBN will be the official broadcasting partner of the AFC Cup game in Bacolod this Feb. 9. 

Offers 

Meanwhile, while waiting for the final results of the tryout, Pascual received an offer to play with the Global FC. 

Global FC is a team under the APC Global Incorporated, which actively participates in the premier football leagues in the Philippines such as the United Football League. 

“He is young, trainable and has a good work ethic,” said Franco Lorenzo, team manager of Global FC. Lorenzo founded the team with Palami. 

They first noticed Pascual when the Cebuano became part of their training pool, who played for the Under-19 Asian Qualifiers in China in 2009 when he was still 17. 

Passion 

Lorenzo said he admired Pascual’s enthusiasm and passion for football and his willingness made him throw the offer to the aspiring professional football player. 

Pascual said he has not confirmed it yet. “I am is still weighing my options regarding the offer to play for Global FC. I still need to consult my parents,” said Pascual. 

Lorenzo offered him a monthly allowance and a slot in the trainings for the Under-23 team of Global FC. 

“I’m not forcing him because I know he still has obligations in Cebu and he still has to pursue his education but this is a good chance towards achieving his dream,” Lorenzo said. 

The young player is overwhelmed by the response of other football teams to his performance. 

“I feel so happy. It’s a good team with good players,” said Pascual. 

Lorenzo asked Pascual to watch the championship game today of the Global FC against the Army Team so that he will get to know the players and observe them. 

He already included Pascual in the list of players for the team’s next game. 

“There are a lot of options. I could go to school here and and train at the same time or I could go back to Cebu and come back whenever they have trainings for the under 23 but my priority would be playing for the Azkals,” Pascual said. 

Published in the Sun.Star Cebu newspaper on January 22, 2011.

Little Azkals open bid in AFC U-13 today

THE Philippine Under 13 (RP U13) tagged as the “Little Azkals” will open their campaign in the Asian Football Confederation (AFC) U13 Festival of Football today.

The team is composed of Major Dean Ebarle of the Abellana National School (ANS); Mario Lorenzo Ceniza of PAREF Springdale; Moiselle Angelo Alforque and Vincent Lobitos of Don Bosco Technology Center (DBTC); Kintaro Miyagi of Bright Academy; Lawrence Colina of the University of Southern Philippines Foundation (USPF); Lorenzo Genco; Yared Anton, Ian Daniel Eamague, Kyric Parao and Henry Hamdam of the Negros Oriental Football Association (NORFA); Mason Trent Vergara of Dumaguete City; Darios Diamante and Javier Romero-Salas of Davao FA; Sebastian Patangan of Dipolog FA; Jeremaih Borlongan and Dimitri Lionel Limbo of Cagayan de Oro-Misamis Oriental FA; Harel Dayan, Josh Albert Miller, John William Abraham, Ray Vincent Sanciangco and Marco Alessandro Casambre of the Rizal Football Association (RIFA).

First up for the Little Azkals will be Laos and Singapore this morning and Indonesia in the afternoon.

Team manager Richard Montayre explained that teams will play a total of 40 minutes with the first 11 of each team playing in the first 20 and the second 11 playing in the remaining 20 minutes.

On June 4 will be a skills test and matches will resume on Sunday and Monday. The Little Azkals coaching staff is made up of Oliver Colina as head coach, Eleazar Toledo as assistant coach, Noel Marcaida as goalkeeping coach and Eliezer Fabroada as coach instruct.

Marcaida said the target for the Little Azkals is to better the winless performance last year’s RP U14. 

/CORRESPONDENT MARS G. ALISON

Azkals to Award Inter-club Winners

By

Participating teams in the Cebu Amateur Football Club (CAFC) 11th National Interclub Football Cup will have an added incentive in vying for the championships. The Philippine national football team more famously known as the Azkals will be awarding the champions of the tournament during its closing ceremonies on May 29 at the football field of the University of San Carlos Technological Center (USC-TC).

The tournament kicks off today in various football pitches in Cebu City. In a final coaches meeting last Thursday night, CAFC president Glenn Quisido urged all teams to go for the title as they will not only have the privilege to be awarded by the Azkals but will also have the chance to share the stage with them and have their photos taken with the national team.

The Azkals will be having their one-week team bonding here in Cebu City as part of their preparation for the World Cup qualifiers. According to Quisido, they will arrive on May 25 and will immediately start their training. Quisido said he was grateful that the Azkals agreed to spare the CAFC one day. In exchange, the club will be partly supporting the national team’s stay in Cebu.

The CAFC will also help the Azkals in their fund-raising activity by selling official Azkals shirts during the week-long tournament. The CAFC will put up booths in the three playing venues—USC-TC, San Roque football field and Paref Springdale and sell the shirts starting today until May 29.

The tournament, considered one of the biggest outside Manila, has gathered teams from the Manila Soccer Academy, San Carlos City, Masbate, Iloilo, Ormoc, Bohol and Northern Samar.

In an effort to make the tournament flow more smoothly, CAFC has decided to schedule only two games in the morning and two games in the afternoon in all playing venues. And just like in the previous years, Quisido lamented the scarcity of girls teams in the tournament. “We have encouraged them to join the tournament, however, most refused because they said they cannot come up with 11 members to compromise a team,” Quisido said. The tournament though has three girls teams contesting the girls 17-Under title. These are Queen City United, Aroroy FC of Masbate and the USC-TC.