July 22, 2017

Titans won the 2013 Milo Little Olympics Football National Finals

Springdale Titans Secondary Football Team with Coach Mario Ceniza

TEAM Visayas swept the elementary and high school football fans in impressive fashion, routing their foes in the final day of the Milo Little Olympics National finals.

The elementary team, represented by the Don Bosco Technological Center of coach Joselito Bono, scored a third straight shutout with a 6-0 win over Mindanao to finish the tournament with nine points, five points clear of second placer Mindanao.

On the other hand, Coach Mario Ceniz and the Paref Springdale Titans capped the affair with an 8-0 rout over Mindanao to win the high school title on goal difference.

Visayas and NCR finished with seven points on two wins and a draw, but the rout over Mindanao gave the home boys a seven-goal cushion over NCR, which beat Luzon, 1-0, yesterday morning.

Meanwhile, it was the third straight title for Don Bosco and they did it in dominant fashion, routing Luzon, 14-0, in their first game and blanking NCR, 5-0 next. So dominant were the Bosconians that their goalkeeper Renz Murillo didn’t even get to touch the ball in the first day.

“It was only against Mindanao that he got to touch the ball,” Bono said.

Against Luzon, Christian Agot and Jascha Tabar took turns in menacing the defense and after 59 minutes, both had five goals to their names, with Agot completing a hat trick in the first 20 minutes. ARcangelo Manlosa also scored twice, while Dustin Ramirez and Jay Ian Alinsugay had one each.

Against NCR, Ramirez, Tabar, Agot and Vinz Ybañez had Visayas up 4-0 in just 20 minutes, while against Mindanao, Don Bosco had a relatively slow day. Ramirez scored twice inside 18 minutes to make it 2-0 before Luis Colina had two more and Agot and Tabar added one each in the second half to seal their win.

On target

Aside from the prolific scorers, the other members of the team are Antonio ALforque, Rey Bryan Cruz, Dale dela Cruz, Carlos Orale, Petrovic Pacifico, Luis Buyco and Januar Villarin.

In the secondary division, Springdale knew it had to win by at least two goals to overtake rivals NCR, which beat Luzon earlier, 1-0. And Mario Lorenzo Ceniza, Pericles Dakay Jr., Ryan James Haosen and Luis Alvarez immediately went to work, keeping Mindanao’s keeper Francis Salvo busy.

However, it was Mindanao that got the first real chance but Philippe Palamine’s striker from 10 yards was denied by a foot save by Conner Hines. In the 20th, Visayas finally got on board, Ceniza unleashed a shot from outside the box that Salvo failed to collect, leaving Haosen a simple tap-in to an open goal.

Six minutes later, Ceniza lovely through ball found an open Haosen but he shot high and a minute later, the wily midfielder didn’t take any more chances, taking a wicked shot from 25 yards for the second goal.

So powerful was the shot that Salva was able to tap it with both hands but it still went in. The keeper then signaled his coach to have him replaced. In the 32nd, Dakay, who scored the equalizer against NCR, made it 3-0 with another shot from outside the box.

Things got worse for Mindanao in the second half with Mark Nacional scoring a hat trick, Dakay adding another and substitute Dominic Canas hitting one for the final count.

The other members of the team are James Balao, Julius Caliva, Maverick Jacalan, Xavier Miguel Larrauri, Jose Lipardo, Sabin Veloso, Jon Young and sub keeper Domycko Villacin, who got in in the final minutes of the game against Mindanao.

Published in Sun.Star News Sports.

Elements of the finest schools in a school run by parents

MANILA, Philippines – While teachers take the place of parents in thousands of schools all over the country, none offer the kind of pedagogy that schools under the Parents for Education Foundation (PAREF) possess. These are schools run by no other than the parents themselves. With a firm resolve, they formed PAREF in 1976, a non-stock, non-profit corporation, whose main objective is to put up schools and to provide parents the means to promote the world-class education they dreamed for their children.

Dreaming of leaders who can bring about social transformation, PAREF focuses its efforts on building men and women of character.

“Members of the alumni,” reported Ralph Guzman of PAREF-Southridge School, “are just about always bumping into co-alumni at the University of the Philippines, the Ateneo de Manila University, De La Salle University, University of Asia and the Pacific, and the University of Santo Tomas.” Indeed PAREF students continue to enter Ivy League schools such as Harvard, Brown, Yale, and Stanford, even earning Latin honors of summa cum laude, magna cum laude, and cum laude. Within its 35 years, the system has produced at least ten summa cum laudes, six of them in American universities. Thus, the University of the Philippines and some DepEd officials have informed PAREF that its student results show that it is one of the top school systems in the country.

For PAREF, its strongest tool for facilitating personal excellence is one-on-one mentoring. Each child is assigned to one mentor, a member of the school personnel, who chats on a periodic basis with the student personally to understand his or her personality, behavior and potential. Inspired by the ideas of a modern saint and Catholic educator, Josemaria Escriva, PAREF is the first organization in the Philippines to practice this type of active partnership between parents and teachers.               

Building on this key strength, PAREF has developed its home-school collaboration system through the years. The latest addition is the incorporation of Harvard-Business-School-style case studies in its New Parents Education Program (NPEP), developed together with Educhild Foundation.

The faculty is considered the heart of the school. Thus, PAREF ensures that its teachers are fit for the purpose of being parent partners outside the home.

PAREF has successfully realized its mission and vision by putting up 7 single-sex schools all over the country: Southridge, Woodrose, Rosehill, Northfield, Springdale, Southcrest and Westbridge. The PAREF Preschools, Inc. (PPSI), meanwhile, is composed of Rosemont, Ridgefield, Rosefield, Ridgefield Iloilo and Rosehill Preschool.

For parents who aspire to play a proactive role in the education of their children and desire for them to grow up living the values of the Catholic Faith, PAREF will be more than happy to welcome them as part of their community. Parents can visit any of its schools all over the country or call (02) 6314292, 7810220, 6311695 or 6877104 or send an email to centraloffice@paref.org. Parents can also visit www.paref.org or drop by the PAREF Office at Units 107-109 Cedar Mansion II, No. 7 Escriva Drive, San Antonio Village, Pasig City.

Source: http://www.philstar.com/education-and-home/2013/10/31/1251400/elements-finest-schools-school-run-parents

Springdale wins against CIE, 48-42

PAREF Springdale Titans defeated the Cebu International Education (CIE), 48-42, in the secondary division of the 1st Private Schools Developmental League at the Cebu Doctors’ University yesterday.

 

The Springdale Titans started slow and trailed the CIE Lions, 18-8, owing to the strong showing of Akeem Amistad. However, the Titans was able to recover in the second quarter with Zach Go, Ace Gochuan, Carlo Diola and Tonyo Carcel combining for 14 points to cut the lead to 24-22.

 

After a give-and-go battle in the third quarter, the Titans banked on Go, Gochuan, Carcel and Dional for their fourth quarter run as they delivered 16 points for their close six-point win.

In the other games, Cebu Cherish School defeated St. Louis School of Mandaue, 54-35, while Mt. Olives Christian Academy routed St. Francis of Assisi School, 63-33.

In the elementary division, Springdale made it 2-0 for the Titans with a 28-23 win over the San Isidro Parish School.

Tournament director Marlove Alquizar said they organized this tournament to give a chance to private schools with small populations to compete in basketball.

The secondary divisions, which attracted eight teams, will have a single round robin, while the three-team elementary division will have a double-round robin play.

The tournament, which will have games every Thursday, Friday and Saturday, will run until March 3.

Published in the Sun.Star Cebu newspaper on February 05, 2012. By Iste S. Leopoldo Saturday, February 4, 2012

Phil. Science High School holds ‘unique’ science-math quiz bowl

PHILIPPINE Science High School–Central Visayas campus (PSHS-CVisC) recently hosted a one-of-a-kind computer-based 5th Science and Mathematics Quiz Bowl in Talaytay, Argao, Cebu, attracting elementary students representing schools all over Region 7.

Usually quiz bowls use projectors to display questions on screen, but in this competition each team was provided their own computer monitor where questions were shown through networking.

Cebu City-based PAREF Springdale emerged as champion in Science quiz bowl, with a whooping 97 points, while West City Exceptional Child Learning Center in Dumaguete City was declared winner in Math with 50 points.

In the Science category, West City Exceptional Child Learning Center also ranked third or second runner-up with 74 points, while Cebu Eastern College in Cebu City was the first runner-up with 88 points.

Bethany Christian School and Minglanilla Special Science Elementary School had a neck-and-neck fight with only a point difference in their score of 38 and 39 points, placing them third and second, respectively in Math category.

They brought home trophies, medals, certificates and cash prizes. The champion got P5,000 while the first and second-runner up received P3,000 and P2,000 each.

“We hold this competition to make our school known in the entire region to attract students who will be taking the National Competitive Examination (NCE). This is also to give schools from far places a chance to experience a unique quiz bowl. It promotes interest in Science and Mathematics among pupils as early as elementary,” said Joseph P. Hortezuela, CViC’s Science, Math and Technology head and over-all event coordinator.

The NCE is a scholastic aptitude test made to measure scientific ability, quantitative ability, abstract reasoning and verbal aptitude of elementary students in order to be admitted to any Philippine Science High School (PSHS) campuses funded by the Department of Science and Technology (DOST).

The rest of the participating schools are Argao Central Elementary School (ES), Bayawan City Science And Technology Education Center, Binlod ES, Bogo ES, Casay ES, Cebu Normal University, Cordova District, Dalaguete Central ES, Danao City Central ES, David-Solomon Learning Foundation, First Assembly Of God Christian School Inc., First Chinese Royal Academy, Langtad ES, St. Michael Parish Montessori Learning Center-Argao, Naga City Division, Obong ES, Ocaña Learning Center Inc., Sabang ES, Sta. Filomena ES – Alegria, Tabunok Central ES, Talaga ES, Talaytay ES, Taloot Central ES, Tanjay City Division, University Of San Carlos – South Campus, West City Science ES and Tulic ES.

The observing schools are Sotero B. Cabahug Forum For Literacy, Oslob ES, Usmad ES and Tulic ES-Math Team. (Princess Rosery H. Cabotaje)

Published in the Sun.Star Cebu newspaper on September 23, 2011.

Run with the Titans

RUNNING PARENTS. Veteran runners Dr. Potenciano "Yong" Larrazabal III (seated, third from right) and wife Donna Cruz (second from right) will lead some 2,000 runners in PAREF Springdale's first foray in running.

FOOTBALL FOOTBALL powerhouse Paref Springdale will take a stab at running as it hosts its first road race dubbed Run with the Titans on Nov. 20 at Parkmall, Mandaue. The event, which will be headed by the parents of the Grade 3 students, is held in connection with the school’s tradition of celebrating its own Father’s Day.

Titan, a moniker used for Springdale students, inspired this year’s batch to create a project of organizing a running event. “It’s the first time we’re doing a run. It is part of our efforts of getting known in Cebu not only in football but also in running,” said Ric Ampiloquio, who is the Paref Springdale school director. 

They will have a 15K, 7K and 3K divisions, while the sprint events will be exclusive for students. Grades 1 and 2 students will have the 200-meter sprint, Grades 3 to 7 will have the 300-meter sprint, while the high school students will have the 500-meter sprint.

They will also have a separate 7K division for teachers and parents.

The run will raise funds for its beneficiary Kaabag Foundation, which holds a feeding program every Monday among 80 kids from different barangays. The school also partners with them every December for their own feeding program.

“We wanted to expose the kids to the society’s conditions,” said James Co, who heads the committee on marketing and logistics.

Also a proud parent of his third-grader Cian, Dr. Potenciano “Yong” Larrazabal III, chairman of the Run for Sight, will make sure that most of the needs of the runners will be provided.

The registration fee is P300 for the 15K, 7K and 3K.

Registration period will start next week at Parkmall, Center for Sight Cebu Doctors’ University Hospital and Shell Station Lahug until a few days before the race.

The run is expected to gather more than 2,000 runners, and the students will be required to attend as Nov. 20 will also be the school’s family day.

Published in the Sun.Star Cebu newspaper on September 14, 2011.

Pages: Gio Gandionco’s dream: ‘Be like Rory’

By John Pages

TIGER Woods is outdated and passé. Today’s young golfers want to be like the 22-year-old Irish champion of the United States Open.

Take the son of Opep and Cora Gandionco. Only 16 years old, he possesses the confidence and maturity of Rory McIlroy.

Angelo Jose “Gio” Gandionco explained: “Rory inspired me to do better and to challenge myself; if Rory can do it, why can’t I? It may be tough to be the best or even get in the PGA Tour but if you have the will and desire, you can achieve it. Rory winning made me realize that it’s possible to win one of the biggest tournaments and beat the best. Like now, I’m touring America playing tournaments and I’m up against the best juniors. I know if I play my game I can beat them like Rory. If I focus on what I’m supposed to do and not get intimidated, I can win.”

Spunk, spirit, and self-assurance.

That’s Gio.

From the U.S., he e-mailed last week. “I just finished my first tournament this second trip here,” said Gio. “It’s the AJGA (American Junior Golf Association) Club Corp Mission Hills Desert Junior in Rancho Mirage (Palm Springs), California. Despite jet lag since I just arrived three days earlier and playing in 114-degree weather, I finished second with a score of 71-73-72, which is my best finish so far here. Most of the other players were from California. LJ Go (from Cebu) also played.”

Gio, a 2-handicapper who also idolizes Rickie Fowler (“He stands out with his fashion statement”), travels next to Pinehurst, North Carolina and Huntsville, Alabama. He then returns home to Cebu, where he is a fourth year high school student at Paref-Springdale (and a five-time Student Athlete Of The Year).

“Last April,” he added, “my mom’s family had a reunion in Hawaii so we went on to Texas to join a tournament at the Texas A&M University. I finished 14th (that was a highly-ranked junior event) and, at the PGA Golf Club in Florida, I finished in the top 10. Here in the U.S., there are 5,000 junior golf players… so I think I have been doing well.”

Gio started golf at the age of four. He used Little Tikes plastic golf clubs and his dad, Opep, who heads the family-owned giant Julie’s Bakeshop, was the person who taught his son how to swing.

By age 7, Gio joined golf events. But, he also had a similar interest in the Azkals game of football. He was Springdale’s striker. Finally, he had to choose. “When my soccer tournaments and golf coach’s schedules competed for my time,” he said, “I knew I had to make a choice. Although I enjoyed the team play in soccer with my friends, I knew it was golf I really loved! So at 11, I started to seriously work on my game.”

Mixing academics and sport has not been easy. “My schedule is very hectic,” said Gio, an honor student who consistently averages 90+. “But, I always try to put time for both practicing and studying. During schooldays, I get dismissed 4:30pm so I head to either the range or the golf course on MWF. On Tuesdays and Thursdays, I work out in the gym. I get home 6:30pm, study, eat, sleep. It is not easy being a student-athlete; you have to learn how to manage your time well. Even while I’m away for a tournament, I still have to read books and do homework to prepare for tests.”

Gio’s dream? To play in the PGA Tour. But first, he says, “My goal in the medium term is to get a scholarship at a prestigious U.S. university. I would like to play college golf, at the same time graduate with a degree in Business.”

His best score? A 5-under par in a Men’s Amateur tournament late last year. “Although I am still working on my game,” he says, “my short game has always been my strength.

Every aspect of my game is still a work-in-progress, and I am open to learning and improving.”

As to the aspects of golf that he enjoys most, he answers, “I love every part of the game: the pressure, the challenge, the intimidation, the hard work, the difficulties that come everyday and, most of all, the feeling of knowing you’re improving.”

Only 16, Gio sounds like a very, very mature person.

Just like Rory.

Published in the Sun.Star Cebu on July 7, 2011.